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Memorial Day 2018: Thank You Troops

va zane me flag 2011Received this note from a loyal blog reader. I could not have said it better myself, and I reprint in honor of all those who serve and have served, and especially to those who gave all:

Mike: A nice blog for the weekend would be a dedication to the REAL HEROES of our country. The men and women that serve and have served in our Armed Forces are owed well-deserved respect and gratitude from us.

“To those who have fallen, you will never be forgotten.”

We WOULD NOT be able to pursue our dreams of freedom and firearms and hunting if not for the men and women that we honor this weekend. Raise a drink during a celebration this weekend and remember our TRUE AMERICAN HEROES.

Amen, God bless our military.

In the photo: On a deer hunt in Virginia, Zane Keen (left), a critical care nurse in the U.S. Army, presented me this combat flag certificate for the work we do to support our troops and veterans through BIG DEER TV and the Veteran’s Outdoor Fund. Zane had flown that flag for me over the field hospital where he worked in Iraq during the height of that conflict. For me, it was the ultimate honor, and remains so to this day.

Deer Science: What Causes Most Fawn Deaths?

nj fawn

Our friend Jeff saw this newborn on his New Jersey farm last Saturday. If the little deer can make it until early August, its chances of survival soar. Scientists note that most fawn deaths occur in the first 12 weeks of life.

A grad student at Penn State’s Department of Ecosystem Science and Management examined the causes of fawn deaths listed in 29 different populations, and calculated the proportion of fawns that died from each of 3 categories: human, predation, and natural causes.

coyote wiht fawn

Not surprisingly predators, namely coyotes, bobcats, bears and dogs, killed the most fawns, about 25% of them in the populations studied.

About 8% of fawns died from natural causes like starvation, disease, hypothermia and drowning.

About 5% of fawns died from human causes (cars to combines to indirect causes, like getting tangled in a fence). The researchers noted that while we humans are the smallest source of mortality for whitetail fawns, it is worth noting as the human impact moves into more and more areas.

On the flip (and good) side 55% of fawns survive.

New Jersey: Police Officer Performs C-Section On Doe, Saves Fawn

nj cop c sectionFrom CBS New York: “A resourceful police officer is being credited with saving the life of baby deer after its mother had been hit and killed in Warren County.”

Noticing movement inside the doe, Officer Jim Vernon sprung into action and performed a roadside C-section on the doe, saving the life of one of two fawns that the unfortunate doe carried.

Animal Control Officer Robert Lagonera then arrived on the scene, took the fawn home, warmed it up, and rubbed its chest to help get the little deer’s underdeveloped lungs working. The fawn is apparently doing well and awaiting its new home.

To these officers and to all their brothers and sisters in blue across the country, thank you for all you do every day!

Photo: Washington Township, Warren County police

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